Demi Lovato says she suffered 3 strokes after a near fatal attack in 2018, heart attack

Demi Lovato says she suffered 3 strokes after a near fatal attack in 2018, heart attack


Demi Lovato has said she had three strokes and a heart attack after a drug overdose in 2018, and that doctors told her she had been minutes from death.

American pop star Demi Lovato says her 2018 overdose led to three strokes and a heart attack. The 28-year-old opened up about her near-fatal overdose for the first time in her new YouTube documentary series, Dancing With The Devil.

The US pop star, 28, says in a new documentary trailer: "My doctors said that I had five to 10 more minutes."

"I had three strokes," Demi Lovato said in a trailer of the docuseries. "I had a heart attack. My doctors said that I had five to 10 more minutes." 

Lovato also told reporters she had been "left with brain damage and I still feel the effects of that".

Those effects include blurry vision that means she can't drive and made reading difficult, she revealed.

The former child star was taken to hospital in July 2018 after being found unconscious at her Los Angeles home. The overdose, reportedly of opioids laced with fentanyl, came a month after she revealed she had broken six years of sobriety.

In the trailer for her new YouTube documentary series Dancing With The Devil, she says: "I've had a lot of lives, like a cat. I'm on my ninth life."

Speaking to journalists on Wednesday, she revealed the lasting effects. "I don't drive a car because I have blind spots in my vision," she said.

"For a long time, I had a really hard time reading. It was a big deal when I was able to read a book, which was like two months later, because my vision was so blurry."

She said she was releasing the documentary "to help people who have been on the same path as I have", adding: "I wanted to set the record straight, and I wanted to reveal it all for my fans."

The trailer, released on Wednesday, gives a glimpse into the events that led to and the aftermath of the singer's overdose in July 2018. Demi Lovato was hospitalised after overdosing at her home in Los Angeles. She revealed that she suffered three strokes and a heart attack while in hospital.  

The trailer shows a clip of Ms Lovato as a child actress on 'Barney & Friends' along with other throwback videos, a recording of the 911 call that was placed after her overdose and interviews from Demi Lovato's friends and family and the singer herself. 

Lovato was a child actor on Barney and Friends and found wider fame on the Disney Channel as a teenager. She starred in its hugely popular Camp Rock film series before launching a successful solo music career.

She has released six studio albums and has appeared as a judge on the US version of The X Factor. Her hits include Sorry Not Sorry and Skyscraper, and she topped the UK chart in May 2018 with Solo, her collaboration with Clean Bandit.

The following month, she released a song titled Sober, in which she revealed: "I'm not sober any more." The overdose came weeks later.

Lovato has been open about her struggles with mental health and addiction throughout her career.

"One of the main reasons I'm coming forward is so I never have to live that life again," Lovato said on Wednesday, according to the Associated Press.

Lovato re-launched her singing career at last year's Grammy Awards and sang the national anthem at the 2020 Super Bowl.

Last month, she sang on a TV special marking US President Joe Biden's inauguration. Dancing With The Devil is due to be released on YouTube on 23 March.

Demi Lovato was 25 when she was hospitalised after being found unconscious at her Hollywood Hills home. 

According to People Magazine, Ms Lovato spoke more about the effects of the overdose and the health issues that followed during Wednesday's Television Critics Association panel.

"I was left with brain damage, and I still deal with the effects of that today. I don't drive a car, because I have blind spots on my vision," she told reporters. "And I also for a long time had a really hard time reading.

 It was a big deal when I was able to read out of a book, which was like two months later because my vision was so blurry."