Gwyneth Paltrow Her Long-Wide COVID-19 Characteristics

Gwyneth Paltrow Her Long-Wide COVID-19 Characteristics


Gwyneth Paltrow is opening up about her personal experience with the novel coronavirus.

In a new post on her Goop website, the 48-year-old actress revealed that she "had COVID-19 early on, and it left me with some long-tail fatigue and brain fog."

"In January, I had some tests done that showed really high levels of inflammation in my body. So I turned to one of the smartest experts I know in this space, the functional medicine practitioner Dr. Will Cole. After he saw all my labs, he explained that this was a case where the road to healing was going to be longer than usual," she wrote.

Gwyneth Paltrow is opening up about her experience with COVID-19 and the symptoms she has been feeling months after recovering.

"I had COVID-19 early on, and it left me with some long-tail fatigue and brain fog," Paltrow wrote in a recent post for her website, Goop.

People who experience symptoms more than two months after being diagnosed with the coronavirus are often called "long haulers."

According to the star, she has been focusing on what she puts into her body since recovering from the virus, adhering to a flexible keto and plant-based diet and refraining from sugar and alcohol.

"So I've been cooking a lot, and some of it is really delicious: I made scallops with crispy capers and sage the other day, asparagus with bacon vinaigrette, and some little artichokes with stuffed herbs and garlic," Paltrow wrote, explaining that she's "been using lots of coconut aminos in my recipes."

Paltrow also shared that she's now taking supplements "in service of a healthier gut."

"Everything I'm doing feels good, like a gift to my body. I have energy, I'm working out in the mornings, and I'm doing an infrared sauna as often as I can, all in service of healing," she wrote. "A side benefit is my skin, which makes me happy—and makes me want to double down on skin care even more. Let's make 2021 the year of never needing makeup, people!"

Paltrow has been working remotely and social distancing at home with her family amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In April, she spoke about the adjustment to British Vogue, telling the publication, "Between work, general anxiety, two teenagers and making sure everyone gets fed, making time for self-care can feel gratuitous."

"I try to carve out 20 minutes at the end of each day to draw a bath, put on a mask (I love our GOOPGLOW peel pads) and read, listen to a podcast or just text about Tiger King," Paltrow said at the time. "Often with a heavy pour of Japanese whiskey."

Paltrow opened up about how her children — daughter Apple Blythe Alison, 16, and son Moses Bruce Anthony, 14 — have been handling lockdown last month, sharing that her youngest has taken self-isolation the "hardest," though he's found an outlet in skateboarding.

Paltrow listed butyrate, zinc, B vitamins, "some vitamin D3," and fish oil as some of the supplements she takes each day. She also said she uses a vitamin C serum and infrared sauna regularly.

"A side benefit is my skin, which makes me happy—and makes me want to double down on skin care even more," she wrote. "Let’s make 2021 the year of never needing makeup, people!"

"What's great is that he's a skateboarder, so he can do a lot of solo, outside exercise and work on skills and tricks and stuff like that," she said during a virtual appearance on  Jimmy Kimmel Live!, "but I think it's very hard to be 14 and ... it's tough on the ones that are still in the most intense developmental stages, I sort of observed."

"Like, my daughter is 16, she kind of knows who she is and she's got her friends," continued Paltrow. "My son would have started high school in September. I think it's hard socially. I've also been amazed how adaptable kids are during this time and how agile they've been."

"Hats off to all these kids around the world who are just getting through it," she added.

With Paltrow opening up about previously having COVID-19, she joins a long list of fellow A-list celebrities who have more publicly documented their experience. Perhaps most notably, Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson were some of the first celebs to go public with their diagnosis, a move which a study later found helped shape public opinion.

According to the study, people surveyed who had heard the news said Hanks’ diagnosis “highlighted the reality of COVID-19” and broadened their understanding of not only the severity of the situation but also their susceptibility to the illness.